How to score iPad SAILS

As the evidence accrues for the effectiveness of SAILS as a tool for assessing and treating children’s (in)ability to perceive certain phoneme contrasts (see blog post on the evidence here), the popularity of the new iPad SAILS app is growing. Now I am getting questions about how to score the new SAILS app on the iPad so I provide a brief tutorial here. The norms are not built into the app since most of the modules are not normed. However, four of the modules are associated with normative data and can be used to give a sense of whether children’s performance is within the expected range according to age/grade level. Those normative data have been published in our text “Developmental Phonological Disorders: Foundations of Clinical Practice” (derived from the sample described in Rvachew, 2007) but I reproduce the table here and show how to use it.

When you administer the modules lake, cat, rat and Sue you will be provided with an overall Level score for all the Levels in each module as well as item by item scores on the Results page. As an example, I show the results page below after administering the  rat module.

SAILS results screenshot rat

The screen shot shows the item-by-item performance on the right hand side for Level 2 of the rat module. On the left hand side we can see that the total score for Level 2 was 7/10 correct responses and the total score for Level 1 was 9/10 correct responses (we ignore responding to the Practice Level). To determine if the child’s perception of “r” is within normal limits, average performance across Levels 1 and 2: [(9+7)/20]*100 = 80% correct responses. This score can be compared to the normative data provided in Table 5-7 of the second edition of the DPD text, as reproduced below:

SAILS Norms RBL 2018

Specifically a z-score should be calculated: (80-85.70)/12.61 = -.45. In other words, if the child is in first grade, the z score is calculated by taking the obtained score of 80% minus the expected score of 85.70% and dividing the result by the standard deviation of 12.61 which gives a z score that is less than one standard deviation below the mean. Therefore, we are not concerned about this child’s perceptual abilities for the “r” sound. When calculating these scores, observe that some modules have one test level, some have two and some have three. Therefore the average score is sometimes based on 10 total responses, sometimes on 20 total responses as shown here, and sometimes on 30 total responses.

The child’s total score across the four modules lake, cat, rat and Sue can be averaged (ignoring all the practice levels) and compared against the means in the row labeled “all four”. Typically you want to know about the child’s performance on a particular phoneme however because generally children’s perceptual difficulties are linked to those phonemes that they misarticulate.

Normative data has not been obtained for any of the other modules. Typically however, a score of 7/10 or less than 7/10 is not a good score – a score this low suggests guessing or not much better than guessing given that this is a two alternative forced choice task.

Previously we have found that children’s performance on this test is useful for treatment planning in that children with these speech perception problems will achieve speech accuracy faster when the underlying speech perception problem is treated. Furthermore, poor overall speech perception performance  in children with speech delay is associated with slower development of phonological awareness and early reading skills.

I hope that you and your clients enjoy the SAILS task which can be found on the App Store, with new modules uploaded from time to time: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/sails/id1207583276?mt=8

 

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