Phonology Assessment in SLP Private Practice

I am continuing with a series of blogs about private practice speech-language pathology. Fortunately many new clinicians can join an established practice and won’t have to think about these things. More frequently however young SLPs are setting up their own practice right out of school or very early on, in their home during their maternity leave for example. The focus of this blog is an aspect of setting up your practice that I am not seeing much advice about in other blogs (maybe I missed blogs about this, please write with links if I have). There other excellent blogs on setting up a private practice, for example 5 Key Steps to Start a Speech Therapy Private Practice (speechbuddy.com). ASHA also has a site the links to many key resources on the topics including ethics issues and quality indicators for your practice: Private Practice in Speech-Language Pathology (asha.org). I recommend these sources, but I am going to fill in a small but critical gap and that is the necessity of having the appropriate assessment materials on hand before you begin. And because you must obtain proper copyright to the materials or buy them (do not borrow them from your other employer!), I will provide some costing information.  In the last blog I talked about the importance of expertise and specializing in those clients you are most qualified to serve. Therefore, I will focus on speech sound disorders in children aged approximately 3 through 8 years.

The need to have assessment materials should be obvious. The practice guidelines world-wide indicate that your treatment goals and plans must be based on the results of a comprehensive assessment. Often times I see SLPs trying to select goals and treatment methods without having the results of a comprehensive assessment to guide their choices. How does this happen? There are so many reasons, almost too many to count but a few of them are unique to the private practice environment. Clients may not want to pay for the time it takes to assess when they are so desperate for treatment and their insurance may cover only 6 sessions. And the SLP may not want to pay for assessment materials when they are so expensive and observation can be valuable. Free observation is not a substitute for systematic assessment and analysis of the data in any circumstance. In the next blog I will demonstrate all the ways that superficial observations can be misinterpreted or at least differently interpreted. Even if the data is a detailed speech sample, a transcription and phonological analysis will be required. So which assessment tools are minimally required? Francoise and I developed a rubric for this, shown as Figure 5-1 in our DPD text and Figure 3-2 in our IntroSSD text. I will show the types of assessments in the table below, including those that are mandatory and those that are optional* and suggest options for each with free and commercial sources indicated.

ConstructPossible TestSource
Contextual factorsCase historyDPD text Publications :: Plural Publishing
Articulation accuracyDEAP Articulation TestDiagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology (DEAP) (pearsonclinical.ca)
StimulabilityDEAP or informalInformal is fine
Oral-motor screenDEAP or other publishede.g., DPD has 3
Speech accuracy in continuous speechReference data for Percent Consonants Correct) Shriberg et al.Reproduced in DPD or see Austin & Shriberg (1997)
Hearing acuityHearing screeningFree apps: HearScreen — THE AUDIOLOGY PROJECT
Phonology*DEAP or hand scored from conversational sampleSee above or DPD
Word Inconsistency*DEAPSee above
IntelligibilityIntelligibility in Context ScaleOverview – Multilingual Children’s Speech (csu.edu.au)
Speech Perception*Speech-Production Perception Task or SAILSFree procedure in DPD or see http://www.dialSpeech.com
Phonological Awareness*Phonological Awareness Test (implicit)Free with norms in DPD
Nonword Repetition*Syllable Repetition TaskOverview – The Phonology Project – UW–Madison (wisc.edu)
Language screene.g., QUILS (3 to 5 yrs) or SPELT (4 to 9 yrs) Or story retell with SALTLanguage Screening Tools – QUILS (quilscreener.com)
SALT Home Page (saltsoftware.com)
Intelligence screen*Kaufman Brief Intelligence TestClinical Assessment Canada – English (pearsonclinical.ca)

This list of required test materials looks lengthy but the ultimate cost is quite moderate. Instructions and normative data for the case history, the oral-peripheral examination, articulation and phonological analysis for toddlers through school age children (with normative expectations), speech perception testing and an implicit awareness test are all tucked inside the DPD text which can be obtained for $150.00. Measures of intelligibility, a hearing screener, and the syllable repetition task are available free on the internet. You should have a standardized measure of articulation and/or phonology. I like the DEAP because it is comprehensive with good diagnostic properties; it costs about $600 with test forms. You can measure expressive language abilities informally although it is time consuming to do so. For younger children the QUILS receptive language screener is only $100. Generally standardized tests are in the $300 to $600 range unfortunately.

You might question the value of the optional tests, especially the K-BIT. However, I strongly recommend having the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test because it includes a receptive vocabulary test as the verbal IQ screen and a nonverbal IQ screen and often you need a little bit of extra information to justify referring children to a psychologist. I have struggled to achieve progress with quite a few preschoolers in my practice who turned out to have very significant but undiscovered cognitive delays. The K-BIT is sold by Pearson for about $500. For children younger than four a play skills assessment can be a good substitute.

So, not worrying about exchange rates and rounding around the edges, you can count on spending $1500 on assessment materials in your first year. You should count on spending that much every year in order to update your editions and add tests in areas not covered by this stripped down list. After you add your provincial and federal association fees and your malpractice and liability insurance you are still not paying very much to start charging people for your services. The real costs come with actually conducting and then scoring the tests, and in phonology, analyzing the data. However, that is the competence that your clients are paying you for. More about that in the next post.

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