Research Engagement with SLPs

I still have days when I miss my former job as a research coordinator in a hospital speech-language department. As a faculty researcher, I try to embed my research in clinical settings as often as I can but it is not easy. Administrators, in particular, and speech-language pathologists on occasion may be leery of the time requirement and often worry that the project might shine too bright a light on every day clinical practices that may not be up to the highest evidence based standard. I always try to design projects that are mutually beneficial to the research team and the clinical setting. As a potential support to the promise of mutual benefit, I was pleased to read a recent paper in the British Medical Journal “Does the engagement of clinicians and organizations in research improve healthcare performance: a three-stage review”. On the basis of an hour-glass shaped review, using an interpretive sythesis of the literature on the topic, Boaz, Hanney, Jones, and Saper drew the following conclusions:

Some papers reported an association between hospital participation in research and improved patient outcomes. Some of these findings were quite striking as for example significantly worse survival from ovarian cancer in “non study hospitals” versus hospitals involved in research trials (my sister-in-law died from this terrible disease this month so I couldn’t help but notice this).

A majority of papers reported an association between hospital participation in research and improved processes of healthcare. This includes the adoption of innovative treatments as well as better compliance with best practice guidelines.

Different causal mechanisms may account for these findings when examining impacts at the clinician versus organization level. For example, involvement in a clinical trial may include staff training and other experiences that change clinician attitudes and behaviors. Higher up, participation in the trial may require the organization to acquire new infrastructure or adopt new policies.

The direction of cause and effect may be difficult to discern. Specifically, a hospital that is open to involvement in research may have a higher proportion of research-active staff who have unique skills, specialization or personal characteristics. These characteristics may jointly improve healthcare outcomes in that setting and that make those staff more amenable to engagement with research.

This last point resonates well with my experience at the Alberta Children’s Hospital in the 80’s and 90’s. The hospital had a very large SLP department, up to 30 SLPs, permitting considerable specialization among us. Furthermore, as a teaching hospital we a had a good network of linkages to the two universities in the province and to a broad array of referral sources. Our working model, that was based on multidisciplinary teams, also supported involvement in research. Currently, in Montreal I am able to set up research clinics in healthcare and educational settings from time to time, but none of them have the resources that we enjoyed in Alberta three decades ago.

Of course, direct involvement in research is not the only way for SLPs to engage with research evidence. Another paper, published in Research in Developmental Disabilities used a survey to explore “Knowledge acquisition and research evidence in autism.” Carrington et al found that researchers and practitioners had somewhat different perspectives. The researcher group (n=256) and the practitioner group (n=422) identified sources of information that they used to stay up to date with current information on autism. Researchers were more likely to identify scientific journals and their colleagues whereas practitioners were more likely to identify conferences/PD workshops and non-academic journals. Respondents also identified sources of information that they thought would help practitioners translate research to practice. Researchers thought that nontechnical summaries and interactions with researchers would be most helpful. Practitioners identified academic journals as the best source of information (but the paper doesn’t explain why they were not using these journals as their primary source).

Finally, the most interesting finding for me was that both groups did not use or suggest social media as a helpful source of information. I thought this was odd because social media is a potential access point to academic journal articles or summaries of those articles as well as a way of interacting directly with scientists.

The authors concluded that knowledge translation requires that practitioners be engaged with research and researchers. For that to happen they suggest that “research should focus on priority areas that meet the needs of the research-user community” and that “attempts to bridge the research-practice gap need to involve greater collaboration between autism researchers and research-users.”

Given that the research shows that the involvement of practitioners in research actually improves care and outcomes for our  clients and patients, I would say that it is past time to bring down barriers to researcher-SLP collaboration and bring research right into the clinical setting.

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Single Subject Randomization Design For Clinical Research

Ebbels tweet Intervention ResearchDuring the week April 23 – 29, 2017 Susan Ebbels is curated WeSpeechies on the topic Carrying Out Intervention Research in SLP/SLT Practice. Susan kicked off the week with a link to her excellent paper that discusses the strengths and limitations of various procedures for conducting intervention research in the clinical setting. As we would expect, a parallel groups randomized control design was deemed to provide the best level of experimental control. Many ways of studying treatment related change within individual clients, with increasing degrees of control were also discussed. However, all of the ‘within participant’ methods described were vulnerable to confounding by threats to internal validity such history, selection, practice, fatigue, maturation or placebo effects to varying degrees.

One design was missing from the list because it is only just now appearing in the speech-language pathology literature, specifically the Single Subject Randomization Design. The design (actually a group of designs in which treatment sessions are randomly allocated to treatment conditions) provides the superior internal validity of the parallel groups randomized control trial by controlling for extraneous confounds through randomization. As an added benefit the results of a single subject randomization design can be submitted to a statistical analysis, so that clear conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of the experimental intervention. At the same time, the design can be feasibly implemented in the clinical setting and is perfect for answering the kinds of questions that come up in daily clinical practice. For example, randomized control trials have shown than speech perception training is an effective adjunct to speech articulation therapy on average when applied to groups of children but you may want to know if it is a necessary addition to your therapy program for a speciRomeiser Logan Levels of Evidence SCRfic child.

Furthermore,  randomized single subject experiments are now acceptable as a high level of research evidence by the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine. An evidence hierarchy has been created for rating single subject trials, putting the randomized single subject experiments at the top of the evidence hierarchy as shown in the following table, taken from Romeiser Logan et al. 2008.

 

Tanya Matthews and I have written a tutorial showing exactly how to implement and interpret two versions of the Single Subject Randomization Design, a phase design and an alternation design. The accepted manuscript is available but behind a paywall at the Journal of Communication Disorders. In another post I will provide a mini-tutorial showing how the alternation design could be used to answer a clinical question about a single client.

Further Reading

Ebbels, Susan H. 2017. ‘Intervention research: Appraising study designs, interpreting findings and creating research in clinical practice’, International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology: 1-14.

Kratochwill, Thomas R., and Joel R. Levin. 2010. ‘Enhancing the scientific credibility of single-case intervention research: Randomization to the rescue’, Psychological Methods, 15: 124-44.

Romeiser Logan, L., R. Hickman, R.R. Harris, S.R. Harris, and C. Heriza. 2008. ‘Single-subject research design: recommendations for levels of evidence and quality rating’, Developmental Medicine and Child Neuroloogy, 50: 99-103.

Rvachew, S. 1988. ‘Application of single subject randomization designs to communicative disorders research’, Human Communication Canada (now Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology), 12: 7-13. [open access]

Rvachew, S. 1994. ‘Speech perception training can facilitate sound production learning.’, Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 37: 347-57.

Rvachew, Susan, and Tanya Matthews. in press. ‘Demonstrating Treatment Efficacy using the Single Subject Randomization Design: A Tutorial and Demonstration’, Journal of Communication Disorders.